Home Page :: About Muirfield Village :: For Future Residents :: What Future Owners Should Know

WHAT FUTURE OWNERS SHOULD KNOW

Owning a property in Muirfield Village has so many benefits: a beautiful area to call home, community amenities, and a convenient location in one of the finest small cities in the country.

Ownership also comes with the responsibility to comply with the Warranty Deed and Design Standards. All properties that are a part Muirfield Village are bound by these standards. The standards ensure continued high property values.

Deciding to purchase a home requires a lot of consideration. These are some important topics a potential resident should know when thinking of purchasing in Muirfield Village:

Questions? The Association staff is happy to help! Email [email protected], call the office at 614-889-0922, or stop by the office between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Muirfield Village is a Planned Unit Development

Muirfield Village is a Planned Unit Development, which means there are standards that govern construction, renovations, and what is permitted to occur with the home and on properties in general. These standards come from the Declaration (Warranty Deed) plus Design Standards found in Property Policies and the Resident Handbook. Enforcement of these standards, called Deed Enforcement, ensures property owners of a rich quality of life and secure property values.

There is an HOA (Homeowners Association), which is Muirfield Association, Inc. One of the duties of the HOA is to enforce community standards.

Most residents welcome and desire having community standards. However, some homeowners do not care to have their choices governed. Potential owners may wish to review the Declaration (Warranty Deed - in particular, Section 8), Property Policies, and the Resident Handbook to understand Muirfield Village rules and regulations before committing to purchase.


Approval Required for Exterior Property Changes

All plans for exterior property changes, additions, and/or removals must be reviewed and approved by the Design Control Committee before any work begins. (Muirfield Association does not regulate what changes occur on the interior of a house.) Some examples include, but are not limited to:

There are also requirements for the quality of materials used in construction, exterior renovations, and on properties. Guidelines and applications for nearly every project can be found in the Design Review section.

Essentially, approval is required for anything that occurs on the exterior of the home or on the property. However, residents do not need approval to:

Radon Unit Approval Necessary: If a seller is required to add a radon mitigation unit as a condition of sale, its location and screening must be approved before the unit is installed. If the current owner does not obtain approval to install the unit, the property will be in violation and the new owner will need to correct violation. The current owner will need to submit a plan in the event a radon unit must be added. Radon unit guidelines and the application may be found here.

Deed Violations Are Attached to Properties

When choosing a new home in any community, buyers generally want to learn about any potential problems beforehand. If a home has problems such as mold, water leakage, or insects, the buyer will inherit the problems if they are not corrected by the seller.

Similarly, it is very important to understand that a new owner of a home in Muirfield Village will inherit any uncorrected violations of the Warranty Deed and Design Standards and will be required to remedy the situation in order to bring the property into compliance.

Per Article 8 of the Warranty Deed, opening paragraph, property violations are attached to the property itself. They are not attached to the owner. A property will not cease to have violations simply because it is transferred to a new owner. If violations are not corrected before the property transfers ownership, the new owner will be responsible for correcting them.

One possible example is a radon unit that was installed without approval. If the installation was not approved by the Design Control Committee and the unit is discovered by the Association, the new owner would be required to submit a proposal for the location of the unit and will likely need to paint the unit and/or plant evergreens to screen the motor.

Another example is dead or dying trees. The Emerald Ash Borer has decimated ash trees in this area. Dead or dying trees must be removed to prevent a violation, not to mention serious potential property damage. If dead or dying trees (or stumps) are not removed by the current owner, the responsibility and cost of removal and replacement will fall on the new owner.

Correcting previous violations may take time and money plus cause distress for a new owner. With this in mind:

Do you have questions about violations in general or any material in the Declaration, Property Policies, or Resident Handbook or any rules, regulations, or standards for Muirfield Village? We welcome and encourage you to contact us or call 614-889-0922!

Requesting Property Changes Before Purchase

Sometimes, potential residents will only want to move to Muirfield if they will be permitted to install elements, such as a pool or recreation equipment, or make other changes to the property, such as removing trees and landscaping or adding a house addition.

The Design Control Committee can only grant approval for any change to the current owner of the property. Therefore, the current owner will need to submit a preliminary plan for the change the potential resident would like to make. There is no cost to submit a preliminary plan.

Read more and get directions for submitting a preliminary plan here.


Annual Assessment

By purchasing a property in Muirfield Village, an owner becomes a member of Muirfield Association. This is a mandated association. For the purpose of providing funds to operate the Association and to make capital improvements, the Board of Directors abides by Article 2 of the Warranty Deed to collect an annual assessment.

In the history of Muirfield Association, Inc., there has never been a need to call for a special assessment. The reserves are adequate and the Board of Directors has been fiscally responsible when working with capital expenditures and operating budgets.

Here's what future owners should know about the assessment:

To calculate the annual assessment amount:

Take the fair market value as placed on the property by the county auditor and multiply it times .00225 to get the annual assessment.

For example, if the fair market value of a property as of January 1 is $300,000, the invoice for the prior year (January 1 through December 31) will be $675.00.

About Sub-Associations

The Declaration governs all properties in Muirfield Village. However, some Muirfield neighborhoods have additional architectural and maintenance restrictions that are enforced by separate sub-associations.

Sub-associations may charge additional fees that are entirely separate from the annual assessment. Each sub-association sets the fee amount, the frequency (for example, billed quarterly or yearly), and what the fee covers.

For information regarding fees, property restrictions, or maintenance performance in a sub-association, visit the Sub-Associations page and contact the appropriate neighborhood representative and/or property maintenance agency.

If in doubt whether a property is part of a sub-association or not, please contact the office.


Questions? Contact the office at 614-889-0922, email , or stop by the office between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. for assistance. We'd be happy to assist you!

New Residents - Home
Future Residents - Home
Real Estate Agents - Home
Why Muirfield Village
New and Future Resident FAQs
Helpful Documents and Links
What Future Owners Should Know
New Resident Materials
Muirfield Village Brochure
New Resident Form